Wavin’ Flag by K’Naan – The Official Song of the 2010 World Cup

If you have not heard this song, you need to listen and let the meaning penetrate.  It defines the true struggle we have all experienced and through the love of others and the courage within ourselves, we have achieved greatness.

Enjoy this live performance from the Austin City Limits show and just feel the song.

Official Lyrics

When i get older, they’ll call me freedom
Just like a Waving Flag.

[Chorus]
When I get older, I will be stronger,
They’ll call me freedom, just like a Waving Flag,
And then it goes back, and then it goes back,
And then it goes back

Born to a throne, stronger than Rome
but Violent prone, poor people zone,
But it’s my home, all I have known,
Where I got grown, streets we would roam.
But out of the darkness, I came the farthest,
Among the hardest survival.
Learn from these streets, it can be bleak,
Except no defeat, surrender retreat,

So we struggling, fighting to eat and
We wondering when we’ll be free,
So we patiently wait, for that fateful day,
It’s not far away, so for now we say

[Chorus]

So many wars, settling scores,
Bringing us promises, leaving us poor,
I heard them say, love is the way,
Love is the answer, that’s what they say,
But look how they treat us, Make us believers,
We fight their battles, then they deceive us,
Try to control us, they couldn’t hold us,
Cause we just move forward like Buffalo Soldiers.

But we struggling, fighting to eat,
And we wondering, when we’ll be free
So we patiently wait, for that faithful day,
It’s not far away, but for now we say,

[Chorus] 2x

(Ohhhh Ohhhh Ohhhhh Ohhhh)
And everybody will be singing it
(Ohhhh Ohhhh Ohhhhh Ohhhh)
And you and I will be singing it
(Ohhhh Ohhhh Ohhhhh Ohhhh)
And we all will be singing it
(Ohhh Ohh Ohh Ohh)

[Chorus] 2x

When I get older, when I get older
I will be stronger, just like a Waving Flag,
Just like a Waving Flag, just like a Waving flag
Flag, flag, Just like a Waving Flag

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Emerging Health Trends 2010: The Road Ahead

Provided by Hewitt Associates (www.hewitt.com)

Hewitt’s The Road Ahead — Emerging Health Trends 2010 survey highlights the strategic direction employers plan to take in the immediate future, as well as emerging long-term trends. The survey covers: strategy and planning; cost trends; and design features of employer-provided health care and other benefits.

The survey also explores employer perspectives on issues related to health care reform and the effects of the continued sluggish economy on employer benefit plans. Data regarding these topics, in combination with those on overall strategy and planning, help us unlock what we can expect from employers in 2010, as well as over the next few years.

Nearly 600 organizations participated in the survey, representing programs affecting more than 10 million U.S. employees and dependents.

Full PDF Report (27 Pages)

http://www.hewittassociates.com/_MetaBasicCMAssetCache_/Assets/Articles/2010/Hewitt_Survey_Findings_TheRoadAhead_2010.pdf

The Clock is Ticking on the End of An Era – Thank you Jack Bauer for bringing heroism back to TV

On November 6, 2001 just weeks after the date that will forever live in our minds and hearts, 24 aired and now with Season Eight and the series about see it’s final hours, we have come full circle as Jack Bauer brings terrorism to it’s knees in the city that for many of us saw it’s even first signs of terrorist activity on American soil, New York. 195 episodes later, we say goodbye to 24.

The show that allowed us to see inside the eye of conspiracy theories, government corruption, international espionage and American loyalty and heroism is about to come to an end.  Riddled in controversy and showered in patriotism, 24 has taken us to the emotional peaks and valleys of human restraint.

Yet, it was not without risk and showered in altercation.  Filmed weeks before the infamous Tuesday morning events of September 11, the original pilot of 24 featured a plane crash that was cut from the show and never aired, yet in season seven, two American planes were forced to collide killing hundreds of innocent civilians.

In 2007, Brigadier General Patrick Finnegan went to California to meet with producers sponsored by the group Human Rights First asking the show to cut some of the acts of torture saying it was promoting illegal acts of international law.

General Finnegan was quoted as saying “I’d like them to stop.  They should do a show where torture backfires…The kids see it and say ‘If torture is wrong, what about 24?’ The disturbing thing is that although torture may cause Jack Bauer some angst, it is always the patriotic thing to do”

During the 2004 season, Fox was forced to air public service announcements about the depiction of Muslims on the show following complaints by the Association of Islamic-Muslim Relations.

Yet, 24 foresaw evolutionary change in government and acceptance.  David Palmer was the first African-American president on television and with strength, prominence and ideals, he stood for the greater good of the United States.   With President Obama sitting in the shadow of President Palmer, will we see someone standing in the shadow of President Allison Taylor someday in the near future?

24 has been aired in the United States, Canada, Africa, Europe, Latin America, Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the Middle East.  With such global outreach, it is difficult to walk away from a show that brought reality to television.

With over 1.4 million fans on Facebook and between 9 and 13 million viewers weekly since inception, this show has become a cornerstone in many households.

Pushing the buttons on what the audience can handle, creators Robert Cochran and Joel Surnow have taken us to a new post 9/11 world where terrorists walk beside us and government agencies are not to be trusted.

Long after the fire and smoke settled on Tuesday, September 11, 2001, 24 carried a flame into households around the world for eight seasons.

To the creators, the cast, the crew, the writers and all the visionaries that allowed us to live vicariously through Jack Bauer, THANK YOU!

24 helped define a generation of change

What the Movie Avatar Taught Me About Committing to Customers, Employees and Products

Blog Provided By Dan Blank (We Grow Media Blog)

Recently, I went to see the movie Avatar. My experience was far more complex than I had expected, and has left me considering how businesses make and break commitments to their customers. The story is in two parts, as I had to go to two theaters to try to see the film.

Theater #1: Making a False Commitment to Customers

I knew the movie was created to be viewed in 3D, so I found a local theater that offered that version. The movie had just been released, so I bought my tickets online and arrived at the theater an hour early. Four people had arrived ahead of me, I chose my seat, and by the time a half hour had passed, the theater was really filling up. Once 7:30 arrived, we were amped to see the movie, having held our odd 3D glasses for an hour, wondering if they would prove magical or not.

But, before the lights dimmed, two theater employees came to the front and told us there would be a slight delay, 5-15 minutes as they got the special 3D projector set up. Here is what followed:

7:45 further apologies, further delays and handing out passes for a free popcorn or soda.
8pm more apologies, and an outright promise that they would be showing the movie, and that we should just bear with them.

8:15pm even more apologies and more promises that they are 100% going to show the film, that they were almost ready.

8:30pm yes, even more apologies and an offer to go into another theater to catch the 2D version of the film that was starting at 8:30. Clearly, this means that even though you had waited an hour or two already, you would be getting the worst seats in the theater for a lower quality of experience (2D vs 3D)
8:45pm the same two teenage theater workers come back in, this time with a security guard, and inform us that the movie was not going to be shown. The offered a free movie pass as well as a refund for the expense of this one.

Now, let’s revisit how many ways the movie theater mismanaged this:

Hiding Critical Facts

Three audience members had managed to find one of the projector operators who explained that this was an issue at both of the previous attempts to show the film earlier in the day, and neither of those screenings could be shown. In fact, the movie had been downloading since the 3pm showing, and the theater operators were hoping it would be ready by 7:30.

When people are paying close to $15 for a ticket, perhaps another $5 or $10 on food, and sitting there with their friends, kids and loved ones with high expectations, these are things that should have been mentioned at the ticket counter well before anyone sat down with the expectation of seeing the film at 7:30 – or at all.

Setting False Expectations

Again and again, as the movie downloaded from the central server to their projector (a process that took 5 hours), they assumed they knew when it would be complete and that it would work. This despite the fact that this theater was new to using the 3D projector, and the projectionists admitted that they had little knowledge of the projector or the process of using it.
So when the computer said 90% downloaded, they told the audience “it should only be 15 minutes” even though they had no idea. So again and again they told us this, even though they clearly were wrong each time.

Once the movie did download 100%, it was “corrupt” and would not play. So their promises that they would absolutely show the movie tonight was based on a faint hope of what they would like to happen, not an experienced voice who felt an obligation to their customers.

Telling Outright Lies

The theater employees made a comment that they were having issues downloading the film from the central server, and that this was happening at theaters across the country. A few quick searches on Twitter via my iPhone left me without a single other example of people complaining about the film being delayed or not shown due to this issue.

After waiting for two hours and forty five minutes, I got my refund and left the theater. Let’s compare this experience with my second attempt to see the movie.

Theater #2: Living Up to Promises

For my second attempt to see Avatar, I went two days later to a theater that offered a full IMAX 3D version of the film. I purchased my tickets online that afternoon, and arrived at the theater an hour before the show time. Here are four key ways that this experience differed from my previous attempt:

Committing to the Customers

When I arrived at the theater (again – an hour before show time), there were already 100 people on line ahead of me. The usher clearly told me where to wait, even though the line was so long that it had to be broken into two halves. While on line, the manager walked around and chatted with patrons. This really got my attention. He wasn’t hiding, ordering underlings to tell people to be patient, he had nice slow civil conversations with people, setting reasonable expectations on the process of getting into the theater, explaining how good the experience was and why they were so excited to have Avatar in IMAX 3D. He really made you feel welcome and excited.

When he came up to me and a few folks around me, he talked about when we would be let in, how the line would move, and allayed our fears about not getting a good seat. He told us that the projectionists felt that being in the first third of the theater was the sweet spot for IMAX 3D, and that most of those 100 folks ahead of us would likely run right towards the upper seats as a matter of course.

He also went on to explain that some of the trailers were in 3D, and that they were quite stunning in their own right. He also told us the process of what went into installing the IMAX theater – where the extra speakers were, and how massive the project was. He really set an expectation that we were in for a treat.

Some folks around me asked him when a few new films would be coming to this theater, and you can tell he was a real movie fan talking about films he was excited about.

Committing to Employees

After that conversation, I still had quite a wait on the line. While I people watched, I kept an eye on the manager. It was amazing to watch him just chatting with folks all over the lobby. Always pleasant, always trying to make their experience a bit nicer.

He kept checking in with the employees in the IMAX theater, as the cleaning crew went in, as other members of his staff talked to folks in the front of the line.

Then I saw him behind the concession stand – SWEEPING THE FLOOR! He didn’t yell at anyone to do it, it wasn’t something that a customer would have even seen – he just saw some spilled popcorn or something, and quickly cleaned it up himself.

I soon realized that his real reason for being back there was to help another employee bring the cart with the sanitized 3D glasses from the back room, through the concession area, through the lobby and to the entrance of the theater. Every step of the way, he made sure things were done right, and never ordered anyone around.

Committing to a Technology

This is not a theater that went kicking and screaming into 3D – they renovated an entire theater, losing three rows of seats in order to install a full IMAX theater. They added a larger screen, extra speakers, and I assume other equipment like the projector. For the 3D glasses (which are much larger than non-IMAX 3D glasses), they are reused, and have to be disinfected between screenings. So this ads the cost of the disinfecting equipment, plus employee training on the process and the time-management to do this between two screenings. That is a big commitment. It should be noted that while this theater serves a very large region, it is not sitting in the middle of a high-income area. It is mixed-income, and requires a considerable drive for most patrons. So they committed to the concept that they would sell enough $15 tickets to this market.

Committing to an Experience

The end result is that this theater made a commitment to the overall movie experience. While its customers deal with making ends meet in a deep recession and competing technologies make it cheaper and easier to get a comparable experience at home, this theater did everything it could to elevate the movie going experience and reinforce the belief that it is indeed worth paying for.

And they didn’t need to offer Godiva chocolates or personal massages to do so. Just an attractive, clean and well-managed theater. It’s just that simple.

What is so interesting here is that I am not telling a story of a brand that exceeded expectations. All I wanted was for a business to live up to its promises and set reasonable expectations. For a $15 ticket to a movie, that is not a silly thing to ask.

In the end, it left me considering how many other types of businesses make partial commitments to their own products, undercut their employees and make false commitments to customers in the pursuit of revenue.
As I consider these same ideals in the online space, it reminds me of ways that some brands do a horrible job trying to connect with customers on the web, and others do a phenomenal job of leveraging social media in fun and meaningful ways that have a real affect on their business.

When you consider building your brand online, which type of business will you be?

http://wegrowmedia.com/what-the-movie-avatar-taught-me-about-committing-to-customers-employees-and-products/

25 best-paying jobs for women – Research by Careerbuilder

Provided by: Kate Lorenz, CareerBuilder.com

When you look at Forbes magazine’s most recent list of highest-paid CEO’s (chief executives of the 500 biggest companies in the United States), you won’t see a woman until No. 48: Irene B Rosenfeld, CEO of Kraft Foods.

In a country where women make up 47 percent of the workforce, women make up just 3 percent of Fortune 500 CEO’s. In addition, women who worked full time earned an average of just 80 percent of what men earned in the same positions in 2008, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

But is salary disparity between genders the issue or is it something deeper?

In the Harvard Business Review blog, Avivah Wittenberg-Cox wrote: “Women represent one of the world’s biggest and most under-reported opportunities. The business world has been so focused on stories like the rise of China that it has not been invited to see that, much closer to home, business could be reaping the benefits of the rise of women. Companies — and their business school feeders — have been slow in adapting and profiting from this shift, and part of the reason is that media too often focus on small, sensational and misleading parts of the story, including aspects like the wage gap.”

Catalyst’s February 2010 Pipeline’s Broken Promise report examining high potential graduates from top business schools around the world found that, even after taking into account experience, industry and region, women start at lower levels than men, make on average $4,600 less in their initial jobs, and continue to be outpaced by men in rank and salary growth.

Only when women begin their post-MBA career at mid-management or above do they achieve parity in position with men — a situation that accounted for only 10 percent of the women and 19 percent of the men surveyed.

Whatever the cause, the BLS reports there are only a handful of occupations where women’s earnings are equal to or exceed men’s including construction and extraction occupations; special education teachers; installation, maintenance and repair occupations; life, physical and social science technicians; and counselors.
We wanted to know, what jobs pay women the most money? Here are 25 jobs where women earn $1000 a week or more, according to the BLS. One thing to note is that they all earn a fraction of their male counterparts.

Pharmacists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,647
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,914
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 86.1%

Chief executives
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,603
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,999
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 80.2%

Lawyers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,509
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,875
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 80.5%

Computer software engineers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,351
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,555
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 86.9%

Computer and information systems managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,260
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,641
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 76.8%

Physicians and surgeons
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,230
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,911
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 64.4%

Management analysts
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,139
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,391
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 81.9%

Human resources managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,137
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,433
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 79.3%

Speech-language pathologists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,124
Men – Median weekly earnings: *
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **

Computer and mathematical occupations
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,088
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,320
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 82.4%

Computer scientists and systems analysts
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,082
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,240Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 87.3%

Physician assistants
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,077
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **

Medical and health services managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,066
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,504
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 70.9%

Physical scientists, all other
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,061
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,535
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 69.1%

Postsecondary teachers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,056
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,245
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 84.8%

Marketing and sales managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,024
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,601
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 64%

Physical therapists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,019
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,329
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 76.7%

Occupational therapists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,016
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **

Registered nurses
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,011
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,168
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 86.6%

Managers, all other
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,010
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,359
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 74.3%

Psychologists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,004
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **

Computer programmers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,003
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,261
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 79.5%

Architecture and engineering occupations
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,001
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,286
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 77.8%

Advertising and promotions managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,000
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **

Education administrators
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,000
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,398
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 71.5%

*No data or data that do not meet publication criteria.
** Data not shown where the male employment base is less than 50,000.