The Rich Roots of Diversity – This Day in History: Ellis Island Closes Its Doors

Fifty-six years ago today, the small utopia just off the coast of Manhattan and New Jersey closed its doors six decades and twelve million dreams later. Ellis Island was the processing center to a new life where immigrants stepped foot on American soil and were greeted by Lady Liberty.

It was an opportunity to start over. Entering into a melting pot of diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds, millions began a journey that future generations have continued with each breath of freedom.

Nearly 40 percent of American’s today can trace their roots to an ancestor who took the ultimate sacrifice to leave their homeland behind in hopes that they and their future families could have a better life.

Enjoy this historical walk through Ellis Island provided by History.com.

Provided by History.com

Full link:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/ellis-island-closes

On this day in 1954, Ellis Island, the gateway to America, shuts it doors after processing more than 12 million immigrants since opening in 1892. Today, an estimated 40 percent of all Americans can trace their roots through Ellis Island, located in New York Harbor off the New Jersey coast and named for merchant Samuel Ellis, who owned the land in the 1770s.

On January 2, 1892, 15-year-old Annie Moore, from Ireland, became the first person to pass through the newly opened Ellis Island, which President Benjamin Harrison designated as America’s first federal immigration center in 1890. Before that time, the processing of immigrants had been handled by individual states.

Not all immigrants who sailed into New York had to go through Ellis Island. First- and second-class passengers submitted to a brief shipboard inspection and then disembarked at the piers in New York or New Jersey, where they passed through customs. People in third class, though, were transported to Ellis Island, where they underwent medical and legal inspections to ensure they didn’t have a contagious disease or some condition that would make them a burden to the government. Only two percent of all immigrants were denied entrance into the U.S.

Immigration to Ellis Island peaked between 1892 and 1924, during which time the 3.3-acre island was enlarged with landfill (by the 1930s it reached its current 27.5-acre size) and additional buildings were constructed to handle the massive influx of immigrants. During the busiest year of operation, 1907, over 1 million people were processed at Ellis Island.

With America’s entrance into World War I, immigration declined and Ellis Island was used as a detention center for suspected enemies. Following the war, Congress passed quota laws and the Immigration Act of 1924, which sharply reduced the number of newcomers allowed into the country and also enabled immigrants to be processed at U.S. consulates abroad. After 1924, Ellis Island switched from a processing center to serving other purposes, such as a detention and deportation center for illegal immigrants, a hospital for wounded soldiers during World War II and a Coast Guard training center. In November 1954, the last detainee, a Norwegian merchant seaman, was released and Ellis Island officially closed.

Beginning in 1984, Ellis Island underwent a $160 million renovation, the largest historic restoration project in U.S. history. In September 1990, the Ellis Island Immigration Museum opened to the public and today is visited by almost 2 million people each year.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Rich Roots of Diversity – This Day in History: Ellis Island Closes Its Doors

  1. Good day I was luck to seek your subject in yahoo
    your Topics is splendid
    I learn a lot in your topic really thanks very much
    btw the theme of you blog is really fine
    where can find it

  2. look at the poor Irish immgrant i feel very bad for them + my granda told me that 2 poeple in are family came here

    cool right and i am soooo sad it makes me want to cry:(

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s